Retromat is not meant for beginners!

Aaaargh, I recently found out that there are indeed people who just use whatever random plan Retromat spits out. Errh mah God! I was in serious denial about this, despite evidence to the contrary.

I never, ever meant for anyone to do this. The random plan was always meant as a starting point from which everyone would merrily click left and right to create a plan that fits their and their team’s needs.

That’s what I meant with the “tweak it” in “Planning your next retrospective? Get started with a random plan, tweak it, print it and share the URL”. It’s a little too subtle. To me it’s obvious that most random combinations will not work well together. It’s obvious to me, because I’ve facilitated retros before and I’m experienced. It’s not obvious for someone new to retros. So here’s a handy note to self:

What is obvious to me is not necessarily obvious to others. In fact, it will be least obvious to the people who need the clarification most.

How could I not realize this for so long? I guess I only get emails from people for whom it works. I don’t hear from those that fail with a random plan or those that “have to pick up the pieces after an inexperienced colleague unleashed a random retro on a team” (actual quote!). I’m so sorry!

I’ll try to find the time to beginner-proof Retromat ASAP. I’ve also thought about the best out-of-the-box, beginner-friendly retro plan I can come up with. It’s practically guaranteed to be better than a random plan.

To reiterate: Retromat is a great source of inspiration for people who know what they’re doing. It’s not a good place to start for people who lack the experience to know whether activities go together well.

In theory Retromat offers millions of plans for retrospectives. In practice only a fraction of these combinations work well. A random plan is highly unlikely to work out!

When you plan a retrospective with Retromat you have to make sure that you know how the results of one activity will be used in the next activity. That’s what the arrows at the sides are for: To flip through the activities for one that fits to the activities before and after it, as well as your team’s situation.

Retromat needs some experience. Please do not recommend it to beginners! At least not without fair warning. Recommend Agile Retrospectives instead and if it’s urgent, this plan. Thank you!

Self-Regulating Discussions with Jeff Patton’s Cups

Do you know this inner debate when you’re facilitating and somebody keeps monologuing: “Is this still relevant? Should I stop him? Do the others look bored? I should cut him off …”

That makes me judge and jury about whether something is still relevant to the whole group. I don’t like to make that call. If you’ve got a team (or team member) that’s prone to rambling you can make the team facilitate themselves with Jeff Patton’s Cups (Jeff himself credits “Katrina”):

Write “Tangent” on several styrofoam cups and distribute them around the table. Whenever someone verbally wanders off one of the other team members can signal it unintrusively by raising one of the cups. Upon the signal ramblers usually cut themselves off and the team can decide whether to park the topic for later.

Other possible cups are “Sold” for people still arguing when they’ve already convinced everyone, “Too much detail”, “No solving” when you’re still trying to frame the problem, and so on.

Keep cups and pens ready. Whatever the team is struggling with, approriate signal cups will evolve.

Obviously the signal doesn’t have to be cups. Paper would also do it. But cups stand out more (figuratively and literally) and are a great visual reminder that each team member can help keep the discussion going.

PS: For something more specific and even more playful check out the Rathole technique by Sandy Mamoli.

Can you repeat the question?

At the beginning of September I was at Agile on the Beach 2016. It was just as good as I expected, which says a lot given that I had really high expectations!

Fantastic talks, learned tons, in beautiful sunny Cornwall – what’s not to like?

Well, one thing. It’s a pet peeve of mine: Despite most presenters doing a really great job, virtually none of them repeated the audience’s questions before answering them. For the camera and everyone sitting in row 5 or farther back the answer was meaningless.

“Mumble brumble bumble mumble?” – “Yes.”

Repeating questions was so rare that several people enthusiastically commended me on doing it in my talk (on what happens when the whole company becomes agile). Not sure I want my distinguishing trait as a speaker to be “at least she repeats the darn questions” that’s why I appeal to you to get into the habit of doing it, too, when you’re a speaker. (Or to continue if you’re already doing it. :) )

If you’re in the audience, you can help by asking the speaker “Can you repeat the question?” after the first unrepeated question.

I had only resolved on doing so during the last talk and it went spectacularly wrong (the original asker repeated the question, again speaking to the front which did not help either me or the camera). After that disaster I didn’t wanna ask again. Instead I decided to bring a sign next time. It’s less intrusive than asking.

Theres-A-Sign

Please help spread the word! (Pun intended ;) )

24 Work Hacks – Das Buch

[English summary: We wrote a book at work (in German) and it turned out amazing!!! It's a cross between coffee table and business book. Watch out for "24 Work Hacks"! If you'd be interested in an English version, tell me so that I can make a case for translating it :) ]

Buchcover von "24 Work Hacks"

Endlich, endlich, darf ich es offiziell verkünden: Wir haben auf der Arbeit (ich arbeite bei sipgate) ein Buch geschrieben und es ist fantastisch geworden! Eine einzigartige Mischung aus Business- und CoffeeTable-Buch, d.h. richtig gute Fotos plus knackige Texte.

Wir haben versucht einen Rundgang durch unser Büro in Buchform zu gießen. Im Herbst 2015 haben wir mit Touren angefangen und seitdem Tausende Besucher herumgeführt und ihnen von unserer Arbeitsweise erzählt. Die Themen reichen von agilen Klassikern wie Retrospektiven bis zu innovativen, eigenen Lösungen wie Open Friday, Peer Feedback und vielem mehr.

Die bisherigen Rückmeldungen zu Beta-Versionen des Buchs bestätigen uns, dass “24 Work Hacks” richtig Lust darauf macht, agil und lean zu arbeiten. Ich wünschte, das Buch hätte es gegeben, als wir 2010 mit Scrum anfingen, denn wir hatten damals keine Ahnung, wie das alles aussehen könnte, wenn wir’s durchziehen. Naja, es hat auch so geklappt, aber leicht war’s nicht und die Inspiration und Vision im Buch hätte uns sicher geholfen.

“24 Work Hacks” erscheint am 15. September. Ihr könnt gerne schon mal auf Amazon vorbestellen :)

Mehr Infos, Bilder, ein Kapitel zum Probelesen usw. findet ihr auf der offiziellen Website zu “24 Work Hacks“.

Sense-Making Machines

Once, on our way to the movies our tram stopped at “Heinrich-Heine-Alley”. It’s a popular tram stop in Düsseldorf, especially for tourists. One such (German!) tourist exited there with his family and remarked: “Ah, Heinrich-Heine-Alley, he was mayor here once.”

That tourist was making sense of his surroundings and “previous mayor” seemed like a reasonable reason to name a street and station after. It is reasonable. It is also wrong. Most Germans (and surprisingly Russians) know that Heinrich Heine was a poet. (I think Heine was born in Düsseldorf, but I don’t really know. I’m just sense-making here ;) )

Humans are sense-making machines in search of a narrative. If facts are missing, we’ll often make them up. Once we got the narrative established it’s hard to let go. It’s why we keep going in the wrong direction, despite disagreeing signage. I love this episode as a reminder of how (made-up) context is everything in Usability. There’s no telling where users end up if they start with a warped context and it’s not their fault. It’s surprising to me that a fellow German doesn’t know Heine, but I’m also aware that it’s entirely possible to be smart and live a good life without knowing that tidbit. It’s not essential. Neither are the ins and outs of your software and its context. Be as obvious as you can.

PS: Fact-checked Heine: Yes, he was born in Düsseldorf, died in Paris. He was never mayor :D

Visualize remaining time with TimeTimer

How do you keep track of time when you facilitate a retrospective or other meeting? How do you make sure you all keep short timeboxes? A timer on a smart phone is one way to do it, but for me it lacks visibility. I forget the timebox and only remember it, when it’s used up.

TimeTimer

What works beautifully are TimeTimers. With a TimeTimer you set the timebox by pulling out a red disk. As soon as you let go, the red disk slowly starts retreating back below the white parts. That way you always have a pie chart of the remaining time. Elegant, easy to use and it communicates time very effectively!

 

 

Host Leadership is the better metaphor

Whenever someone mentions “Servant Leadership” it triggers an almost Pavlovian reflex in me to say: “Have you heard of ‘Host Leadership’? IMHO it’s the much better metaphor for Scrum Master work.”Host-Leadership

Part of SM work is enforcing rules. How can you do that as a servant? The metaphor breaks. As a host it makes perfect sense: You have to make sure that everybody is having a great time and not one person ruining it for many. As the host you set house rules.

Despite being a big fan I haden’t even mentioned Host Leadership in this blog, yet. Until now :) If you’d like to know more, here’s the 6 roles of Host Leadership and the official webpage for Host Leadership.

Open Up Solution Space by Reframing

Last year I shared Reframing advice from Esther Derby, about how you can change your own thinking about “difficult” people.

This year it’s advice from Veronika Kotrba and Ralph Miarka about how to open up solution space in other people’s thinking:

When someone says “My boss never listens to me” this is a very definite statement. “Never” and “always” imply that it’s a done deal, no use trying. You can open up possibilities by reframing this to “Aha, up until now, you  have not succeeded having your boss listen to you.” “Up until now” introduces the idea that this can change. There’s hope, hooray!

Mein rechter, rechter Platz

[English summary: Armin Schubert suggested a super nice "Set the stage" activity for Retromat that doesn't translate well, so I present it in the original German.]

Immer wieder bekomme ich tolle Vorschläge für Retromat, die ich schweren Herzens ablehnen muss, meistens weil es bereits eine sehr ähnliche Aktivität im Retromaten gibt. Bei der folgenden Idee von Armin Schubert war der Grund, dass die Aktivität nur auf Deutsch funktioniert. Aber wozu habe ich ein Blog ;)

Hier kommt also Armins “Mein rechter, rechter Platz”: Diese Aktivität ist für den Anfang einer Retro und läuft wie folgt ab:

Die Teilnehmer sitzen im Kreis und starten mit dem bekannten Kinderreim “Mein rechter, rechter Platz ist leer, ich wünsche mir den $Name her!” mit einer entscheidenden Änderung im Text:

“Mein rechter, rechter Platz ist voll und der $Name, der ist toll!” Dann noch drei positive Eigenschaften des rechten Nachbarn und schon ist derjenige selbst dran.

Die Idee dazu ist in einer Retrospektive entstanden, weil wir einen schnellen aber positiven Einstieg gesucht haben. Das wirkte am Anfang etwas hölzern, war dann aber ein grosser Erfolg, auf dem im Nachgang immer wieder referenziert wurde.

(Falls jemand den (neuen) Kollegen rechts von sich nicht kennt, kann er gerne die anderen Anwesenden um Hilfe bitten. Hat bei uns mehrfach super funktioniert!)

Thanks for sharing with us, Armin!

My friend, the time clock

This little exchange happened on Twitter:

twitter_no-overtime

I thought the topic might be worth elaborating on, as “no overtime” seems to be a rare thing. It’s time to confess my undying love for our time clock:

Time Clock

Obviously, it’s not its looks that secured the clock my affection. In fact, whenever I take visitors on a tour through the sipgate offices, the time clock is an unexpected sight. An young-ish company with foosball, ping pong and hammocks and then a time clock? Isn’t that a bit backwards?

No, the time clock is what prevents me from working overtime! When I was working trust-based hours, I always did overtime. When there was something to finish, I would stay to finish it, but I wouldn’t leave earlier, when there was nothing immediate to do. I didn’t really keep track of my overtime so I was unsure, when it would have been okay to leave.

At my current workplace, whenever I swipe my little card in front of the time clock to check in or out it tells me if I’m on track for 40h a week or not. You see, the 40h week did not come about because factory owners in the early 1900s thought how nice it would be if everybody got home at a reasonable hour and had 2 days of weekend. No, it happened because Ford’s tests showed that humans have about 40h of productive work per week in them. Working more does not lead to more results. At least not middle and long term. That’s why we don’t want overtime at sipgate at all.

And we follow up on that directive. We talk to colleagues who work too much. Sometimes we force people to take their annual leave (which is 30 days btw. It’s beyond me how anyone gets by with less than 25 days of paid leave. Poor US folks…)

Despite the time clock we don’t have core hours. Everyone can arrive and leave at any time they want. That’s super practical for doctor’s appointments and such. You just have to co-ordinate with your team. Missing the daily stand up should be an exception, because otherwise it’s difficult to work together ;)

Some of our customer supporters works in shifts, staffing a hotline. They have to be on time for their shift. But other than that, we’re pretty free to distribute our time as it fits ours and the company’s needs.

What system is in place at your work? Do you like it?