“How can I excite others for retrospectives?” – Don’t be too elaborate

“I’d like to share the awesomeness of retrospectives. How can I excite others?”

On the surface, this question is similar to last week’s about motivation. But they are asked in very different moods. People who ask “How can I motivate people” are subdued. They’ve often run a couple of retros that somehow fell short of expectations.

People who ask “How can I excite others?” are bouncing on the balls of their feet, eyes sparkling. They haven’t run a retro yet, but they want to hold ALL the retros! They are so excited that they want to wow everyone away with how awesome of a first retro they facilitate. They come to me looking for some ultra fancy activity from the Retromat treasure trove.

And I don’t deliver something fancy. Instead I’ve got a word of caution: If you want to convince people that retrospectives are a fabulous idea, then don’t make it too fancy. Don’t start with something that’s far removed from people’s normal interactions. It’s likely to confuse or make participants defiant. Depending on the team, appearing as too much of a tree hugger hurts your credibility. Let’s ease everyone into it.

In my experience a “normal”, well-facilitated retrospective already has a huge effect. You don’t need more than that to get started. If the participants get real benefits (shared understanding & improvements in their work flow), they usually want to do it again. Keep your enthusiasm and down the line you get to try funkier activities 😉

Btw, I totally get the desire to create something elaborate. When I introduce teams to retrospectives in my freelance work I always get the urge to pick special activities. I mean, they are paying me the big bucks. How can I possibly go there with a variation of my default retrospective? Well, because it’s the right thing to do: It’ll get them good discussions and actionable action items. It’s easy to understand what’s happening and what to do. It’s versatile and they can repeat something similar without me. And remember: These well-worn tried-and-true activities are new to them.

If that hasn’t convinced you, let me share some anecdotal evidence with you:
A friend of mine just started at a company where retrospectives have a bad rap. He’s a developer, but he pushed for a retrospective in his team and facilitated it himself. The team doesn’t have an agile coach and he was new so he didn’t have a huge stake in the content, yet. He’s a good facilitator but it’s not his main job. This was his first real retrospective ever.

He took my default retrospective and adapted it a bit. The feedback he got was along the lines of “The best retrospective I have ever seen in this company with a wide margin”. Really great for him, really terrible for the company. That’s why I think you don’t need anything fancy to start. Just the basics, well done.

Does that make sense? Have you ever introduced people to retros? How did it go?

PPS: Have you heard of Wall-Skills.com? It’s main idea is teach people basic concepts when they weren’t looking for something to learn, e.g. about retrospectives or the agile mindset.